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A Hanging Essay Help

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❶It was like men handling a fish which is still alive and may jump back into the water.

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a hanging essay help

The narrator is a colonial policeman. This brings a significant element of autobiography to the story. Orwell worked as a British colonial policeman in Burma, and was often deeply disturbed by what he saw, especially in relation to the unfair treatment of the indigenous population.

Everyone had changed colour. The Indians had gone grey like bad coffee, and one or two of the bayonets were wavering. We looked at the lashed, hooded man on the drop, and listened to his cries — each cry another second of life; the same thought was in all our minds: We went through the big double gates of the prison, into the road. We all began laughing again. We all had a drink together, native and European alike, quite amicably. The dead man was a hundred yards away.

Although they can put some physical distance between themselves and the executed man, they cannot truly escape the horror of what they have seen.

Their souls have been corrupted, and no amount of hard-drinking camaraderie is going to change that simple fact one iota. In my opinion, the main point of this essay is how immense of a thing it is to kill a human being.

The gallows stood in a small yard, separate from the main grounds of the prison, and overgrown with tall prickly weeds. It was a brick erection like three sides of a shed, with planking on top, and above that two beams and a crossbar with the rope dangling.

The hangman, a grey-haired convict in the white uniform of the prison, was waiting beside his machine. He greeted us with a servile crouch as we entered. At a word from Francis the two warders, gripping the prisoner more closely than ever, half led, half pushed him to the gallows and helped him clumsily up the ladder.

We stood waiting, five yards away. The warders had formed in a rough circle round the gallows. And then, when the noose was fixed, the prisoner began crying out on his god. It was a high, reiterated cry of "Ram! The dog answered the sound with a whine. But the sound, muffled by the cloth, still persisted, over and over again: Minutes seemed to pass.

The steady, muffled crying from the prisoner went on and on, "Ram! The superintendent, his head on his chest, was slowly poking the ground with his stick; perhaps he was counting the cries, allowing the prisoner a fixed number-- fifty, perhaps, or a hundred. Everyone had changed colour. The Indians had gone grey like bad coffee, and one or two of the bayonets were wavering.

We looked at the lashed, hooded man on the drop, and listened to his cries--each cry another second of life; the same thought was in all our minds: Suddenly the superintendent made up his mind.

Throwing up his head he made a swift motion with his stick. There was a clanking noise, and then dead silence. The prisoner had vanished, and the rope was twisting on itself. I let go of the dog, and it galloped immediately to the back of the gallows; but when it got there it stopped short, barked, and then retreated into a corner of the yard, where it stood among the weeds, looking timorously out at us. He was dangling with his toes pointed straight downwards, very slowly revolving, as dead as a stone.

The superintendent reached out with his stick and poked the bare body; it oscillated, slightly. He backed out from under the gallows, and blew out a deep breath. The moody look had gone out of his face quite suddenly. He glanced at his wrist-watch. The dog, sobered and conscious of having misbehaved itself, slipped after them. We walked out of the gallows yard, past the condemned cells with their waiting prisoners, into the big central yard of the prison.

The convicts, under the command of warders armed with lathis, were already receiving their breakfast. They squatted in long rows, each man holding a tin pannikin, while two warders with buckets marched round ladling out rice; it seemed quite a homely, jolly scene, after the hanging. An enormous relief had come upon us now that the job was done. One felt an impulse to sing, to break into a run, to snigger. All at once everyone began chattering gaily.

The Eurasian boy walking beside me nodded towards the way we had come, with a knowing smile: Do you not admire my new silver case, sir? From the boxwallah, two rupees eight annas. Francis was walking by the superintendent, talking garrulously. It wass all finished--flick! It iss not always so--oah, no! One man, I recall, clung to the bars of hiss cage when we went to take him out. You will scarcely credit, sir, that it took six warders to dislodge him, three pulling at each leg.

We reasoned with him. Ach, he wass very troublesome! Even the superintendent grinned in a tolerant way. We could do with it.

2011 question 10 “A Hanging”

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After reading and understanding George Orwell’s feelings through his experiences in his essay “A Hanging.” We come to realize that George Orwell, a visitor from the European establishment, gets the opportunity to participate in the execution of a Hindu man.

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George Orwell's "A Hanging": In George Orwell's "A Hanging", Orwell tells the story of what it was like to witness a man being hung. In this narrative there is a progression of emotions that can be seen in Orwell.

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In my opinion, the main point of this essay is how immense of a thing it is to kill a human being. You can see this in a couple of ways in the essay. First, you see it in Orwell's discussion of that very idea: he talks about how strange and wrong it is that the guy could be walking along, alive, and . A Hanging Essay Help. At best essay writing service review platform, students will get best suggestions of best essay writing services by expert reviews and ratings. Dissertation writing services USA & UK, thesis writing company.A Hanging () is a short essay written by George Orwell.

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George Orwell's: A Hanging Essay - A world famous Essayist, a Novelist, and Critic, George Orwell is a name most people have heard at one point in their lives. His work continues to be used for educational purposes and held to a very high standard by many. Carefully read George Orwell's narrative essay "A Hanging." Then, to test your understanding of the essay, take our multiple-choice reading quiz. (When you're done, be sure to compare your answers with those that follow the quiz.) Finally, reread Orwell's essay, jotting down .